Hello, Sign In

Should Immigration Be Legal – Research Guider

The paper 'Should Immigration Be Legal' is a worthy example of a research proposal on social science.
Immigration can be understood as the act of an individual from a certain country coming to live permanently in another country. Further, it can be explained as the movement of people from their home countries to other countries which they are not natives with the aim of living there. Immigration normally occurs due to various reasons among them better economic opportunity etcetera. However, immigration should not be made legal. This essay, therefore, will discuss why immigration should not be made legal outlining reasons to support this argument. Additionally, the paper will give some benefits of immigration before providing a summary conclusion.

Firstly, immigration should not be made legal because the move will reward lawbreakers.  Vaughan, (2013) discusses: making immigration legal will hamper the local law enforcement programs that are meant to curb terrorists as well as other criminals with malicious intentions from getting into the country. Since legalizing immigration will excuse all forms of immigration, the identity, as well as the integrity of the immigration department, will thus be compromised. The implication of this is detrimental to the country. Legalizing immigration will provide relief to criminals from the penalties that should be meted on them. This is through the registered provisional immigrant where the fraud committed by these immigrants will be pardoned. They include identity fraud, social security account frauds among others. As such, public safety concerns are likely to be high. An example is a bill in the U.S that legalizes aliens who have been thrice convicted on different occasions. Convicts are definitely people with bad records and as such the bill allows the convicts of homicides, drunk driving, and theft among the many felonies to be allowed in the country. This in a way is rewarding these criminals. Further, state law is required to ignore convictions on human trafficking and alien smuggling. This is a worse move that any nation that engages in is undoubtedly going to regret.

Secondly, immigration leads to the loss of jobs for the natives in the country. This is because as the new immigrants come in, they increase competition on job opportunities available at home. As such the chances they take would have been for the natives. Globally, the trends in unemployment are very high. The job market is getting poorer each day and when the immigrants come to the country and take the chances of employments that natives would have rather had, it worsens the situation.  (Camarota, 2011) explains: immigrants’ movement to the U.S has led to massive job losses. This can be seen in the statistics of 2000 – 2010 where 34% of the working-age population went to the immigrants. This can reveal how much of the jobs were lost by the natives to the immigrants. It, therefore, follows that a considerable amount of natives lost by 34% the employment opportunities due to immigration. These people have been paying taxes all through their life, they have been taking part in voting and shaping the politics and governance of their country yet some aliens come from nowhere and takes the opportunities away from them.

Additionally, legalizing immigration would result in an increase in the crime rate.  Morin, (2013) explains that this is because of the following reason. First, the immigrants in a new country may not have equal opportunities as the natives when it comes to access to economic opportunities. As such they find life difficult and resort to unconventional means that involve crime to survive. This increases the rate of criminal activities in the host country. Secondly, second-generation immigrants have been identified to have just equal crime susceptibility like the natives in America. This implies allowing an immigrant to the country through legalization will have a futuristic increase in crime through their second generation. These criminals would not have existed had their parents been denied entry into the host country.

Further, Edmoston & Smith (1997) discuss: legalizing immigration has an impact on the government’s spending. Allowing Immigrants to the country leads to an increase in population, therefore, the demands of the population increase as well as requiring a heavy budget to finance the provision of amenities and other services. This implies the government spending on the provision of these services will go up. As such legalizing immigration overstretches the government’s spending on the public limiting development. The resultant effect will be felt on the citizens because the government will demand more money which means more taxes levied on the citizens. This will have a ripple effect on the costs of living within the country as they will go up.

Finally, Head, (n.d)  discusses: legalizing immigration would lead to a rise in a permanent democratic majority. This is a situation that any native is bound to develop cold feet. For instance, in the US a majority of immigrants are Latinos. The Latinos are mostly democratic voters. Further, the legal Latinos happen to be the fastest-growing population in the US. As such their support will determine the presidency of the US. This has an implication in the voting pattern where their support for the Democrats may make the presidency a forgotten goal for the republicans. These Latinos too have been in the front in support of immigration laws that will legalize immigration. The implication would mean the elections in the US will be unfairly competitive in a way since the presidency will only come from one party. This will reduce accountability in the side of the executive since the opposition will not be having a chance to form a government. 

Conclusion

Even though immigration provides opportunities to the aliens, protects fugitives and enables the emergence of new culture and traditions into the host country, it is not supposed to be legalized. The essay has, therefore, explained five reasons (reward lawbreakers; loss of jobs for locals; rise in crime; draining government funds; as well as making a permanent democratic majority) why immigration should not be legalized. As such it strongly does not support legalizing immigration.

Annotated bibliography

 Camarota, S. A. (2011, March 10). center for immigration Studies. Retrieved April 2015, 2015, from Immigrant Gains and Native Losses in the U.S. Job Market, 2000 to 2010: http://cis.org/node/2649

The author offers a critical approach to the concepts surrounding immigration. It is worth to note that Key local and international policies regarding immigration are discussed by the author. The credibility and reliability of this book correlated to the deeply researched information and it is relevant to the topic under discussion.

Edmonston, B., & Smith, J. P. (Eds.). (1997). The New Americans:: Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. National Academies Press.

The author offers an insight into the socio-economic and political challenges of immigration. This text uses updated data to defend the theoretical concepts surrounding immigration. The relevance of this book is unquestionable as it exhausts critical factors that force countries to allow immigration. However, there is significant criticism arising from limited statistical support on the published findings.

Head, T. (n.d.). 8 Arguments Against Immigration Reform. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from About News: http://civilliberty.about.com/od/immigrantsrights/tp/Arguments-Against-Immigration-reform.htm

The author emphasizes the need to incorporate legal reforms in the immigration department. Most of the countries have been portrayed as institutionally subjective when it comes to immigration. A critical assessment of socio-economic theories regarding immigration is equally addressed by the author. There is statistical evidence that emphasizes theories just justify arguments for immigration legalization. 

Morin, R. (2013, October 15). Crime rises among second-generation immigrants as they assimilate. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from Pew Research Centre: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/10/15/crime-rises-among-second-generation-immigrants-as-they-assimilate/ 

Morin addresses the threat of social misfits that can easily infiltrate society as a result of immigration. The overriding economic pressure that arises from immigration and the subsequent shocks are points clearly highlighted by the author. Concepts of assimilation in regard to immigration and social restructuring. This book is critical in giving an insight into the proponents of legalizing immigration.

Vaughan, J. (2013, May 2). Centre for Immigration Studies. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from Senate Bill Rewards & Protects Lawbreakers, Undermines Law Enforcement: http://cis.org/vaughan/senate-bill-rewards-protects-lawbreakers-undermines-law-enforcement

Vaughan offers an insight into the increasing pressure among countries especially in the wake of increased global terrorism to prevent immigrants. Offering a case study of how this issue has been discussed by top political personalities is clear. This book is evidently emphasizing increasing legal redress and political debate towards immigration. The United States is particularly used as the point of reference giving this book significant confidence in reliability and relevance.



References

Camarota, S. A. (2011, March 10). center for immigration Studies. Retrieved April 2015, 2015, from Immigrant Gains and Native Losses in the U.S. Job Market, 2000 to 2010: http://cis.org/node/2649

Edmonston, B., & Smith, J. P. (Eds.). (1997). The New Americans:: Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration. National Academies Press.

Head, T. (n.d.). 8 Arguments Against Immigration Reform. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from About News: http://civilliberty.about.com/od/immigrantsrights/tp/Arguments-Against-Immigration-reform.htm

Morin, R. (2013, October 15). Crime rises among second-generation immigrants as they assimilate. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from Pew Research Centre: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/10/15/crime-rises-among-second-generation-immigrants-as-they-assimilate/

Vaughan, J. (2013, May 2). Centre for Immigration Studies. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from Senate Bill Rewards & Protects Lawbreakers, Undermines Law Enforcement: http://cis.org/vaughan/senate-bill-rewards-protects-lawbreakers-undermines-law-enforcement

Contact Us